Eastman Computer Music Center (ECMC)
CMP 422 : Advanced Computer Music Techniques

Course syllabus for

semester 2, spring 2015


Staff email addresses and phone numbers:
Allan Schindleraschindler AT esm.rochester.edu274 1575
Clay Mettens mettensmusic AT gmail.com
Zach Sheets zachsheets91 AT gmail.com
Nikolas Jeleniauskas nikolas.jeleniauskas AT gmail.com
Michael Fraziermichaelfraziermusic@ AT mail.com
James Garber centurylife AT gmail.com
Jason Buchananjasontbuchanan AT gmail.com
Studio phone in room 53274 1578

(In all of the email addresses above, delete the word "AT" and the surrounding spaces, and substitute the @ symbol.)

Some "emeritus" staff members who continue to provide valuable expertise and assistance for ECMC concerts and activities, and whom you may get to know:
Matt Barbour, Steven Rice and Paul Coleman


Principal online and hardcopy documents (available in rooms 52 and 53) for this semester's work:
(Online web documents that you likely will need to access frequently for this semester's assignments are shown below in in bold font)
(Hard copy books are availale in room 53.)

  • ECMC Users' Guide : http://ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/courses/cmp421-2/userguide/toc.pdf (Class users will be given a printed copy of this document)

  • Csound:
    • The Csound Reference Manual, available online at
      http://www.csounds.com/manual/html/index.html (version 6.0) (the official, most up-to-date frames version of the Csound reference manual);
    • http://www.ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/csound-manual-5.14/index.html (version 5) (ECMC copy; may provide quicker access from ECMC systems, but not the current version of the manual)
    • Eastman Csound Tutorial by Allan Schindler, available online at www.ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/csound/allan/ (Class users will be given a hardcopy printout of this document, but you may want to use the online version instead for quick access to links to pertinent sections within the Csound 5 Reference Manual )
    • Score11 Reference Manual, available online at http://ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/score11 ; Csound score file preprocessor (Linux only)
      (Class users should already have a hardcopy printout of this document.)
    • nGen manual, an alternative cross-platform score file pre-processor for those running Csound on Macintosh, Windows or Linux systems, available at http://mikelkuehn.com/ngen/man2/ngenman.htm
    • Boulanger, Richard, The Csound Book : hard copy book; a compendium of chapters by various authors that provides more in-depth information on Csound coding and aspects of digital signal processing.
    • The Floss Manual introduction to Csound: https://www.flossmanuals.net/csound/; introduction to using Csound
    • The FlossManuals Csound "book" by Joachim Heintz and Iain McCurdy, http://en.flossmanuals.net/_booki/csound/csound.pdf ; Tutorial overview of selected Csound resources
    • Aiken, Jim, Csound Power! The Comprehensive Guide: hard copy book; basic tutorial-level introduction and overview; despite the title, it is not really very comprehensive

  • Pure Data :
    • Farnell, Andy: Designing Sound : hard copy book; examines sound design and sound transformation using Pd patches as models; includes tutorial introduction to Pd which includes a tutorial introduction to Pd.
      Code examples in the book are available at http://aspress.co.uk/sd/index.php
    • ECMC Pd binder : Hard copy binder available in the studio; Information on running the Pd application
    • The main Pd documentation page, available at http://puredata.info/docs/ contains links to Pd documentation sites and pages.

  • PVC: :
    • ECMC PVC Documentation, available online at http://ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/pvc/index.html
    • ECMC PVC Example Files (Schindler) Hardcopy example input files for the PVC programs). Use the commands
      lsex pvc and getex filename (e.g. getex plainpv1) to list and access these files.

  • SuperCollider 3 :
  • Additional books on computer music resources available for your use in room 53:
    • Boulanger, Richard and Lazzarini, Victor, editors, The Audio Programming Book : examines concepts of programming digital audio
    • Cope, David, Virtual Music : studies of artificial intelligence and algorithmic procedures applied to music composition
    • Eargle, John, The Microphone Book : a scholarly and authoritative compendium of information on microphones and how to use them
    • Huber, David and Williams, Philip, Professional Microphone Techniques : despite a sometimes annoyingly breezy writing style this book contains much helpful information on microphones and tips on miking particular instruments and voices
    • Loy, Gareth, Musimathics, volume 1 : introduction to the physics and mathematics of music and digital audio
    • Roads, Curtis, editor, The Computer Music Tutorial : excellent (though aging) general purpose introduction to computer music techniques and resources
    • Roads, Curtis, Microsound : a comprehensive study of granular synthesis techniques
    • Smith, Steven, Digital Signal Processing : recommended supplemental text for information on the mathematics of signal processing
    • Winkler, Todd, Composing Interactive Music : resources and ideas for interaction between live performances and computer programs; most of the examples employ the MAX programming language, but much of the information is equally pertinent to Pd
  • None of these books, which are intended for use at any time by all
    ECMC users, should ever leave the studios.

    Listening examples: But wait...there's still more!
    In the folder /Volumes/snd/listening on machine gesualdo you will find 47 complete "classic" electroacoustic compositions by composers from Varese to the present, compiled by Matt Barber into FLAC soundfiles, for your listening pleasure, edification and inspiration.


    Backup media

    I recommend that you use a flash drive as the primary medium to back up your work on all ECMC systems. However, in a pinch, DVD discs (-r, +r, -rw and +rw formats), CD-R and CDRW compact discs in jewelboxes can be purchased at any time, as needed, for $1 from an ECMC staff members.

    Course grading: three individual appointment tests, a class presentation and a semester project

    Note: This syllabus, and some of the weekly assignments and test material below, are rather complicated because you are given some options on which software resources you wish to pursue in detail and which software resources you wish to cover in in a more general, less concentrated fashion. In particular, in our examination of basic sound synthesis and signal processing software during the first six weeks, you can either:
    • devote all of your attention to work with Csound, in which case you will be expected to create some fairly sophisticated, musically useful Csound tools for your compositional work; or, alternatively
    • you can choose to explore synthesis procedures using both Csound and Pd (referred to as the "Pd track" in the weekly assignments below). If you choose to explore Pd implementations of basic synthesis procedures in addition learning corresponding Csound implementations, I will not expect your Csound examples to be as detailed. Please read the test and weekly assignments carefully and make your choices.
  • FEBRUARY 3,5 : Initial checkpoint appointment on synthesis and analysis procedures (10 % of semester grade).
    Come prepared with ANY TWO of the following three items:
    • one Csound orchestra file and companion score file using one or more synthetic (oscillator) sound sources
    • one Csound orchestra file and companion score file that reads in (with soundin or diskin2) a soundfile, then processes and alters this source sound in some fashion
    • one Pd synthesis patch employing oscillators and envelope generators
  • MARCH 3, 5 : Compositional etude 1 : Graded evaluation of a very short (15-30 second) compositional study based on sound synthesis and/or DSP processing of sampled sounds made with Csound or Pd.
    These etudes do not (and probably should not) be complex, and can incorporate only a handful of soundfiles. Musicality is more important than technical wizzardry. (20 % of semester grade)

  • APRIL 7, 9 : Compositional etude 2 : Another 15-30 second miniature composition using ONLY source soundfiles or realtime playback created with SuperCollider, and/or with PVC (plainpv, chordmapper, etc.) and/or with mammut. (20 % of semester grade)

  • Class presentation : a 10 minute presentation on a piece of electroacoustic music of your choosing (with my approval), dealing both with technical aspects of the work (sound sources and synthesis or sound processing techniques, formal structure, etc.) and with aesthetic and musical issues ("What is the composer trying to do in this piece? Where is the musical interest concentrated? What is unique about this piece?") If you prefer, you can concentrate on a DSP or generative compositional technique that we are not covering in depth in class, rather than on a specific composition. (20 % of semester grade)

  • Monday MAY 4 : Your semester project, a composition or realtime performance of approximately 3 to 6 minutes incorporating a variety of resources discussed during the semester, will be performed on our class concert. (30 % of semester grade)
    Schedule for class presentations :
    Thursday Feb. 19 : ____________________________   Thursday, Feb. 26 : ___________________   Thursday March. 26 : ____________________________
    
    Tuesday March 31 : ___________________ Tuesday April 14 : _____________________ and ___________________
    Thursday April 16 : _____________________

    Weekly Assignments for Semester 2:

    All lab work will parallel the class discussions and reading assignments for each week.

    { All optional assignments -- suggested but not required, or something you might wish to read in the future for more information -- are printed below in small type and surrounded by curly braces. }

    Week 1, Jan. 13, 15

    Principal topics: (1) course structure, lab times and class presentation dates for this semester; (2) synthetic sound sources: how oscillators work; fixed waveforms, tables and phasors; (3) the Music N languages and a brief history of sound synthesis; (4) introduction to Csound; orchestra and score files and the unified file format; (5) oscillators, and function tables;(6) using the Csound reference manual; (7) floating point and 16 bit integer amplitude representation; (8) some basic Pd oscillator and synthesis objects

    1. Eastman Csound Tutorial (Schindler), Chapter 1
    2. Csound Reference Manual:
      (HTML links to all Csound Reference Manual topics listed here and in the reading assignments for the next few weeks are provided in the online version of the Eastman Csound Tutorial.)
      Orchestra files:
      Score files:
      Unified file format for orchestras and scores: http://www.csounds.com/manual/html/CommandUnifile.html
    { Additional suggested but not required reading for this week: }
  • { Csound Reference Manual: Csound command line options http://www.csounds.com/manual/html/CommandFlags.html }
    (You can't possibly remember all of these flag options. Just know that these pages are here for future reference, when you may want or need to try something different.)
      In case you want more detailed information:
    • {Roads, Computer Music Tutorial: The Unit Generator Concept (page 89) through Table-lookup Noise and Interpolating Oscillators [page 95] }
    • { Boulanger, The Csound Book:}
        {Chapter 1, Pages 6-15 : What is Csound and How Does It Work through The First Three P-Fields}
        {Chapter 2, Pages 65-73 : Understanding and Using Csound's GEN Routines }
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. The basic (bare minimum) resources of Csound that you should master during each of the first five weeks of this semester is presented in the Assignments sections at the ends of the first five chapters of Eastman Csound Tutorial. See the end of Chapter 1 for some recommended studio work for this week.
    2. Create Csound orchestra and score files and compile them with the csound command both in real time and into soundfiles. Practice varying the sampling rate, control rate (kr) and word size.
    3. If you have not already done so, finish cleaning up your soundfile and Unix directories on madking and gesualdo, organizing and archiving important files and deleting all files you will not need immediately.
    4. [Pd track : construct some simple oscillator/table patches based on the models listed under week 1 in the Pd supplement to this syllabus.]

    Week 2, Jan. 20, 22

    Principal topics: (1) envelope generators ; (2) reading soundfiles into Csound (and Pd); (3) creating bash shell aliases (abbreviations) in your .bashrc file to run Csound and other programs with desired options; a look at bash aliases and functions in the /etc/profile.d/turnkey.sh file that you already are using; (4) brief indivual appointments to look at your work so far with Csound

    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. Eastman Csound Tutorial : Chapter 2
    2. Csound Reference Manual:
           -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -
      { Recommended for additional information and clarification, but optional: }
    3. { Roads, Computer Music Tutorial:
      • Time-varying Waveform Synthesis (pages 95 to 100, up to Instrument Editors); and
      • Additive Analysis/Resynthesis [page 144] through Methods of Sound Analysis for Additive Synthesis [page 145] }
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. See the Assignment at the end of Chapter 2 of the Eastman Csound Tutorial.
    2. Try out various envelope generators to control the amplitude and pitch of notes.
      Suggestion: Try adding unit generator display (Csound manual, page 13:8) to one of your orchestra files, and use it to take a look at the envelopes you are creating.
    3. [Pd track : add some envelope generators such as line~ or vline~, and other control objects to your Pd patches, and look at some of the model patches listed under week 2 in the Pd supplement to this syllabus.]
    Assignment :
    Begin preparing your Csound and/or Pd examples for your first graded evaluation in two weeks. (See week 4 below.)

    Week 3, Jan. 27, 29

    Principal topics: (1) amplitude, ring and frequency modulation; (2) alternative ways to read soundfiles into Csound and Pd; (3) building some flexibility and "intelligence" into synthesis and signal processing algorithms with program control statements; (4) in preparation for our work with analysis/resynthesis, important concepts in DSP, fast Fourier transforms, time and frequency representation of signals; (5) individual appointments in preparation for next week's test
    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. Eastman Csound Tutorial: Chapter 3
    2. Csound Reference Manual:
           -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -
      { Recommended for additional information or clarification, but optional: }
    3. { And for future reference: }
    4. {Roads, Computer Music Tutorial:}
      • {Ring modulation, pages 216-221}
      • {Amplitude modulation, pages 221-224}
      • {Frequency modulation, pages 224-235 (up to, but not including, Exponential FM )}
      • {Multiple Carrier FM, pages 236-239}
      • {Multiple Modulator FM, pages 239-242}
    5. { Boulanger, The Csound Book: }
      • Chapter 11, Pages 237-240 : Amplitude Modulation
      • Chapter 12, Pages 261-279 : Frequency Modulation
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. See the Assignment at the end of Chapter 3 of the Eastman Csound Tutorial.
    2. [Pd track : construct some modulation patches based on the models listed under week 3 in the Pd supplement to this syllabus.
      Also recommended, despite some bad coding, the article and Pd patches for Six Simple Synthesizers by Obiwannabe (Andy Farnell) at http://www.obiwannabe.co.uk/html/music/6SS/six-simple-synthesisers.html
    3. Prepare for your graded appointment next week.
    [Suggested listening : ]
    [Phone by John Chowning and Archimedes by James Dashow , both available in the folder /Volumes/snd/listening on gesualdo. ]

    Week 4, Feb. 3, 5

    One hour of class time will be devoted to individual appointments for a
    GRADED EVALUATION OF YOUR INITIAL WORK WITH CSOUND (and, optionally, synthesis with Pd).

    Come prepared with ANY TWO of the following three items:
    • one Csound orchestra file and companion score file using one or more synthetic (oscillator) sound sources
    • one Csound orchestra file and companion score file that reads in a soundfile with soundin or diskin2, then processes and alters this source sound in some fashion
    • one Pd synthesis patch
         -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    -
    Principal topics for the second hour: pulse train generators; pseudo-random number generators; stochastic and probability elements in music
    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. Eastman Csound Tutorial, Chapter 4
    2. Csound Reference Manual : - - - - - - - - { Recommended for additional information or clarification ,but optional: } - - - - - -
    3. { Boulanger, The Csound Book: Chapter 16, pages 321-338 }
    Labs and individual studio work:
    1. See the Assignment at the end of Chapter 4 of the Eastman Csound Tutorial.
    2. [Pd track : construct some patches based on the models listed under week 4 in the Pd supplement to this syllabus.]
    3. { Suggestion: Type "csoundexamples". This will move you into the directory /usr/local/lib/csoundexamples, where you will find tutorial testfiles and more sophisticated instrument subdirectories, all containing example Csound orc/sco pairs that illustrate usage of various opcodes. If you find an instrument you like you can copy it into your own directory and experiment with it. } The cd-rom accompanying The Csound Book, available by asking a staff member, also includes many orc/sco examples. Browsing through one or more of these collections may give you some additional ideas or models for constructing your own Csound algorithms.

    Week 5, Feb. 10, 12

    Principal topics: (1) Filters, delay lines, reverberators and "global" instruments; (2) an introduction to analysis/resynthesis and phase vocoder procedures; (3) the PVC package and plainpv ; (4) brief individual appointments to look at your sound synthesis work

    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. ECMC Users' Guide, Section 9, pages dealing with PVC
    2. Introduction to the PVC programs and description of plainpv, available online at http://ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/pvc/
    3. ECMC PVC EXAMPLE FILES binder (available in rooms 52 and 53): plainpv example files
    4. Eastman Csound Tutorial, Chapter 5
    5. Csound Reference Manual :
      - - - - - - - - - -
      { Recommended for additional information or clarification,but optional: }
    6. { Roads, Computer Music Tutorial: Subtractive Synthesis (pages 184 through 193) }
    7. { For future reading: Boulanger, The Csound Book:}
      Chapter 20, pages 433-436 : Filters
      Chapter 22, pages 451 ff.: Delay lines
      Chapter 23, pages 467 ff. : reverberators
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. Create several resynthesis soundfiles with the plainpv program.
    2. Eastman Csound Tutorial Chapter 5 assignment
    3. [Pd track : construct some filter patches based on the models listed under week 5 in the Pd supplement to this syllabus.]
    [Suggested listening : ]
    [ Out of Breath by Paul Koonce, available on in the /Volumes/snd/listening folder on gesualdo: ]

    Week 6, Feb. 17, 19

    ****************************************************************************
    Special event this week:
    Ossia Concert, Wednesday February 18, 8:00 Kilbourn Hall , supported by the ECMC and the Switch~ Ensemble, featuring electroacoustic works by David Fennessy, John Luther Adams, Eric Wubbels and Clay Mettens
    ***************************************************************************

    Principal topics: (1) summaries and usage illustrations of some additional PVC programs, including twarp and chordmapper; (2) conclusion of our study of basic synthesis resources of Csound and Pd; (3) macros and macro preprocessing of score and orchestra files; (4) alternate tunings; (5) 5 minute individual appointments ; (6) Thursday class presentation

    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. ECMC PVC Example Files : look at (and listen to) several of the example PVC files for pvanalysis, twarp, convolver, spectwarper, harmonizer and chordmapper
    2. Eastman Csound Tutorial, Chapter 6
    3. { Optional: Csound Reference Manual:
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. Try out some of the additional PVC programs covered in class and labs this week
    2. Try out some of the additional Csound unit generators introduced in this week's class and in Chapter 6 of the Eastman Csound Tutorial
    3. [Pd track : construct some simple oscillator/table patches based on the models listed under week 6 in the Pd supplement to this syllabus.]
    Assignment :
    Begin working on your first compositional etude, due the week of March 4-6
    You have a choice here. If you wish, you can use either Csound or else Pd exclusively to create all of the sounds in the etude, or you may use both of these applications. In addition to this actual miniature composition, we will look at and listen to the synthesis and DSP sources (Csound orc/sco pairs or Pd patches) and resulting soundfiles used to create this etude.

    Week 7, Feb. 24, 26

    Principal topics: (1) the mammut application; (2) the Spear phase vocoder application. (3) phase vocoder resources in Csound (psvanal, pvsadsyn , et. al) (4) GUI and MIDI resources in Csound; (5) class presentation; (6) a portion of class time will be devoted to individual appointments to look at your preparations for your compositional etude, due next week

    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. ECMC Users' Guide, Section 9.1.3 : Using mammut
    2. The mammut help file at http://www.notam02.no/web/research-and-development/software/mammut-help/?lang=en
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. Try out the mammut program and see if you find it useful in creating sounds that would be difficult to create using any other technique.
    2. Try out the Spear application.
    3. Complete your first compositional etude, due next week

    Week 8, March 3, 5

    COMPOSITIONAL ETUDE 1 DUE
    Regular class and labs will not meet this week.
    Graded evaluation of a very short (15-30 second) compositional study based on sound synthesis and/or DSP processing of sampled sounds made with Csound or Pd. In addition to this actual miniature composition, we will look at and listen to the synthesis and DSP algorithms (Csound orc/sco pairs and/or Pd patches) used to create this etude



    March 9 - 13 : SPRING BREAK : No class or labs. Take a break. Or else write lots of music. Or lin Kriya Yoga.

    Week 9, March 17, 19

    Principal topics: An introduction to SuperCollider 3 on Macintosh and Linux systems; SC (SuperCollider) tutorial, Help and Guide resources; interpreter (sclang) and server (scsynth); some common SC objects, Classes, Ugens and message types; oscillators and other signal generators (e.g. SinOsc, Saw, Blip, PinkNoise); audio and control rates; a look at several introductory level SC code examples.
    Reading and web browsing assignment:
      First thumb through a few pages of chapter 1 of the hardcopy The SuperCollider Book by Wilson, Cottle & Collins (available in room 53), which is fairly comprehensive, and also, for comparison, a few pages in chapter 1 of the online A Gentle Introduction to SuperCollider by Bruno Ruviaro, which is more concise but somewhat less inclusive. Choose one of these two sources as your primary text book reading introduction to SuperCollider for the next three weeks.
    1. Either:
    2. The SC IDE user interface: http://doc.sccode.org/Guides/SCIde.html
    3. Become familiar with the Tour of UGens SuperCollider Guide at http://doc.sccode.org/Guides/Tour_of_UGens.html. Try out several of the Band Limited Oscillators, Table oscillators and Aperiodic Sources: Noise Ugen code examples.
    4. { Recommended: Take a look at the Index of SC Guides at http://doc.sccode.org/Guides/. Some of these Guides may prove quite useful to you in learning SC. For this week, you might wish to look at the guides Glossary.html, More on Getting Help.html and ClientVsServer.html. }
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. Try out several illustrative code examples and synths. Play the example, then try as best you can to understand how it works. Then try altering it and making additions or substitutions.
      Tutorial examples can be found within the SuperCollider application examples/demonstrations/ folder (/Applications/SuperCollider/examples/demonstrations on gesualdo and /usr/share/SuperCollider/examples/demonstrations on madking). Fairly sophisticated examples are available at http://ecmc.rochester.edu/ecmc/docs/supercollider/examples/index.php or in the ecmchelp file scexamples.1 on madking. HERE HERE GET GESUALDO FOLDER and install HERE HERE Play with several of these examples this week, and with additional examples during the nex two weeks.
    2. Access the SC help system ( http://doc.sccode.org/ ) frequently to learn about and experiment with new objects
    3. Begin seriously formulating your ideas for your semester project. It is possible that one of your two compositional etudes may form the skeletal basis for your project this semester. We will discuss your project ideas in two weeks.

    Week 10, March 24, 26

    Principal topics: further work with SuperCollider; generating "scores" for SC with Pbinds and Patterns; some additional Ugens, including filters and panning; envelope generators (Env, EnvGen); doneActions ; Thursday class presentation.
    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. Either
    2. { Recommended for more complete information and examples on Patterns and Pbinds: Harkins, H. James: A Practical Guide to Patterns : http://distractionandnonsense.com/sc/A_Practical_Guide_to_Patterns.pdf }
    3. Read through and execute the examples for Help files Env and EnvGen. Make sure you know how to use doneActions.
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. Learn how to use Patterns and Pbinds to create "scores" for the SuperCollider SynthDef and for your own SynthDefs. Construct some some of your own Pbinds and Patterns
    2. Continue exploring the Tour of UGens, SC Help files and SC Guides.
    Assignment:
    Begin working on your second compositional etude, due in two weeks. This brief etude can employ soundfiles created EITHER with PVC (and/or mammut) or else may employ SuperCollider. Devote some of your lab time to discussing both your semester project and your second compositional etude ideas with your TA. In addition to the etude, we will look at the SuperCollider code or else the PVC script files used to create your etude. If your etude incorporates soundfiles created with mammut, you should be able to tell me the source soundfile and how you modified it with mammut.

    Week 11, March 31, April 2

    Principal topics: SuperCollider : Building your own SynthDefs; playing these SynthDefs with Patterns; Tuesday class presentation
    Thursday's class time will be devoted to individual appointments to discuss your semester project ideas, and also your progress on your second compositional etude, due next week.
    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    1. Either
    2. Continue exploring the Tour of UGens, SC Help files and SC Guides.
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    1. Finish preparation of your second compositional etude, due next week.
    2. Try making some simple (or not so simple) SynthDefs on your own and "playing" them with Pbind patterns. examples. Connect these building-block SynthDefs into complete patches.
    3. Lab time also will be devoted to help with your second compositional etude and your semester project.

    Week 12, April 7,

    COMPOSITIONAL ETUDE 2 DUE : Graded evaluation of your work with SuperCollider or with analysis/resynthesis procedures
    No regular class or labs this week. Individual appointments during which we will play and discuss your second compositional etude, and to looking at the SuperCollider or analysis/resynthesis methods used to create this etude.

    Week 13, April 14, 16

    Principal topics: (1) SuperCollider (concluded) : mic input; reading in soundfiles; writing soundfiles; panning; reverberators; granular synthesis; (2) Tuesday and Thursday class presentations; (3) time permitting, we will open the floor to questions and comments about, or comparisons between, any or all of the software applications we have looked at this semester (4) individual appointments on Thursday to discuss your progress on your semester project

    Reading and web browsing assignment:
    No reading this week. (Finally!!!)
    Labs and individual Studio Work :
    Desperately work on your semester projects

    Week 14: April 20-24 : Jury Week. No class or lab.

    Although regular labs will not meet, you can contact the TAs to obtain their help with your semester project.


    Week 15 : April 28 :

    This final class of the semester will be devoted to class playing and discussion of your semester projects in progress, and to preparing for the concert of these projects next Monday.

    SEMESTER PROJECTS ARE DUE ON MONDAY MAY 4.
    If your composition requires the use of an ECMC laptop, your project is due by noon on Sunday May 3 ready for copying to, and testing on, the ECMC laptop.
    A concert of works produced in the studios this term will be presented on May 4 in room 120

    When your project is completed, archive all of the soundfiles you wish to save onto a flash drive or onto optical CD or DVD discs. Unless you will be continuing to work with these soundfiles during May and/or June, delete your soundfiles from the sound disks on all ECMC systems. Staff members will remove any soundfiles that you do not delete. Clean up your user directories on all ECMC systems as well, archiving important files onto removable media discs and then removing all files that you no longer need.

    If you want to work in the studios over the summer or next fall, please advise me of this in an e-mail message so that your directories will be retained and your name included on the list of authorized studio users.